Captain Scarlet - Netflix

Imaginative and fantastical Supermarionation fun in the year 2065 when Earth's security organisation, Spectrum, spearheads an expedition to Mars.

Captain Scarlet - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2005-02-12

Captain Scarlet - Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons - Netflix

Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons, often referred to as Captain Scarlet, is a 1960s British science-fiction television series produced by the Century 21 Productions company of Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, John Read and Reg Hill. First broadcast on ATV Midlands from September 1967 to May 1968, it has since been transmitted in more than 40 other countries, including the United States, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. Characters are presented as marionette puppets alongside scale model sets and special effects in a filming technique that the Andersons termed “Supermarionation”. This technology incorporated solenoid motors as a means of synchronising the puppet's lip movements with pre-recorded dialogue. Set in 2068, Captain Scarlet presents the hostilities between Earth and a race of Martians known as the Mysterons. After human astronauts attack their city on Mars due to a misunderstanding, the vengeful Mysterons declare war on Earth, initiating a series of reprisals that are countered by Spectrum, a worldwide security organisation. Spectrum boasts the extraordinary abilities of its primary agent, Captain Scarlet. In the first episode, Scarlet acquires the Mysteron healing factor of “retro-metabolism” and is thereafter considered to be virtually “indestructible”, being able to recover fully from injuries that would normally be fatal. Captain Scarlet, the eighth of ten puppet series that the Andersons produced during the 1950s and 1960s, was preceded by Thunderbirds and followed by Joe 90 and The Secret Service. In terms of visual aesthetic, the series represented a departure from Thunderbirds on account of its use of non-caricatured puppets sculpted in realistic proportions. Re-run a number of times in the UK and purchased by the BBC in 1993, the 32-episode series has entailed tie-in merchandise since its first appearance, from dolls to original novels and comic strips in the Century 21 Publications children's magazine, TV Century 21. In comparison to Thunderbirds and other earlier series, Captain Scarlet is generally considered “darker” in tone and less suited to child audiences due to stronger on-screen violence and themes of extraterrestrial aggression and interplanetary war. The transition in the puppets' design has polarised critical opinion and drawn a mixed response from former production staff, while the concept of an indestructible protagonist has also been called into question. However, the series has been praised for its inclusion of a multinational, multiethnic puppet cast and its depiction of a utopian future Earth. Having decided to revive the series in the late 1990s, Gerry Anderson supervised the production of a computer-animated reboot, Gerry Anderson's New Captain Scarlet, which was broadcast in the UK in 2005.

Captain Scarlet - Writing - Netflix

With a provisional series title of The Mysterons, Anderson and his wife, Sylvia, wrote a pilot script in August 1966. This differed significantly from the final draft of the first episode. Initially, it was decided that the Mysteron duplicate of Captain Scarlet would be artificially resurrected by an advanced Spectrum computer rather than reviving naturally, and that thereafter he would no longer be truly human but a “mechanical man” akin to an android. Another early ambition was for each episode to feature a guest star voiced by a well-known actor of the day. To this end, the role of the World President in the first episode was originally intended to be voiced by the American-born actor Patrick McGoohan. With Anderson serving chiefly as executive producer, the majority of the writing input for Captain Scarlet was provided by Tony Barwick, who had previously written for the short-lived second season of Thunderbirds. Originally given the role of script editor, Barwick went on to pen 18 of the 32 episodes himself, and was also often required to make substantial changes to other writers' work. While discussing his approach to writing episodes in a 1986 interview, he drew parallels between the premise and characters of Captain Scarlet and those of Thunderbirds, suggesting, for example, that Spectrum was similar to International Rescue and that the character of Captain Black was like the earlier recurring villain from Thunderbirds, The Hood.

Captain Scarlet - References - Netflix